Agenda item

Notices of Motion

1.       PROPOSED BY COUNCILLOR HILTON

 

“This Council notes that Gloucester Day is a recently reinstated annual day of celebration of the city's history and culture.


Gloucester Day was first held in the modern era on 5th September 2009, but originally dates from the lifting of the Siege of Gloucester in 1643, during which the city held out against royalist forces during the First English Civil War. The lifting of the siege was celebrated annually in the city for years afterwards but died out in the nineteenth century.


This council thanks the organisers of this year's Gloucester Day celebrations and wishes them well in planning the 2017 celebrations.

This council also remembers the sacrifice and determination of the people of Gloucester as they defended the parliamentary garrison (10th August to 5th September 1643) against the besieging army of King Charles I. The siege ended with the arrival of a relieving parliamentary army under the Earl of Essex.


This council recognises that the Siege of Gloucester is one of the most important events in the history of this city of which we should all be proud and that we agree to set up a cross party working group to consider what else we can do to remember and commemorate the events of 1643."

 

2.       PROPOSED BY COUNCILLOR LUGG

 

“Gloucester City Council notes the recent media attention and prominence of environmental crime, primarily flytipping, and particularly in the Barton and Tredworth ward.

 

Council notes that Barton and Tredworth was, last year, the City’s flytipping hotspot with 1519 incidents reported, more than ten times the number in second place Moreland (147) and Matson and Robinswood (132). The ward has had the worst problem in the City for many years.

 

Resident’s quality of life and the appearance of the City is damaged by flytipping and other environmental crimes. The taxpayer has to pick up the bill.

 

Council calls upon the newly appointed Cabinet Member for Environment and the administration to take a firm stance against environmental crime as a priority, drawing on best practice from elsewhere in prevention and enforcement, to reduce the incidence of flytipping across Gloucester, particularly in identified hotspots.

 

Council resolves to work more effectively with local agencies, community groups and Gloucester City Homes, where appropriate, to use all available powers and step up enforcement to prosecute those flytipping.”

 

3.       PROPOSED BY COUNCILLOR HAIGH

 

This Council notes the recent Rowntree Foundation report ‘Overcoming Deprivation and Disconnection in UK Cities’ which identified communities in Gloucester that form a disconnected core, and poor access to jobs and housing are key factors in deprivation.

 

Gloucester is the 139th most deprived district in the country, with areas of several wards in the top decile for housing, employment and income deprivation nationally.

 

The Rowntree report identified that top down “macro” approaches to deprivation, such as investment through the LEP, are doing little to improve the life chances of people in these wards? they recommend that a “micro” approach is taken to combat the unique factors that affect the life chances of residents. Regeneration in the City Centre is important, but the benefits of that regeneration must reach across the City and into all of our communities.

 

Deprivation can only be challenged effectively when professionals in housing, health and educational services work together with residents to meet the needs and issues of specific neighbourhoods and communities.

 

Councils have a duty to shape communities and drive improvements in the lives of resident.

 

This Council should take a lead in bringing together agencies and communities to identify and act upon the factors that are barriers to work and housing.

 

This Council resolves to take a flexible approach to working with communities to meet the needs that they identify, as well as achieving improved life chances for residents.

 

This Council will work with communities and agencies to formulate neighbourhood agreements, establishing responsibilities on both sides, as a way of building strong and active communities in a time of shrinking budgets.”

Minutes:

(1)  Notice of Motion from the Liberal Democrat Group

 

34.1    Moved by Councillor Hilton and seconded by Councillor J. Brown:

 

“This Council notes that Gloucester Day is a recently reinstated annual day of celebration of the city's history and culture.

 

Gloucester Day was first held in the modern era on 5th September 2009, but originally dates from the lifting of the Siege of Gloucester in 1643, during which the city held out against royalist forces during the First English Civil War. The lifting of the siege was celebrated annually in the city for years afterwards but died out in the nineteenth century.

 

This council thanks the organisers of this year's Gloucester Day celebrations and wishes them well in planning the 2017 celebrations.

 

This council also remembers the sacrifice and determination of the people of Gloucester as they defended the parliamentary garrison (10th August to 5th September 1643) against the besieging army of King Charles I. The siege ended with the arrival of a relieving parliamentary army under the Earl of Essex.

 

This council recognises that the Siege of Gloucester is one of the most important events in the history of this city of which we should all be proud and that we agree to set up a cross party working group to consider what else we can do to remember and commemorate the events of 1643."

 

34.2    Councillor Noakes moved the following amendment which was seconded by Councillor Cook:

 

“This Council notes that Gloucester Day is a recently reinstated annual day of celebration of the city's history and culture.

 

Gloucester Day was first held in the modern era on 5th September 2009, but originally dates from the lifting of the Siege of Gloucester in 1643, during which the city held out against royalist forces during the First English Civil War. The lifting of the siege was celebrated annually in the city for years afterwards but died out in the nineteenth century.

 

This council thanks the organisers of this year's Gloucester Day celebrations and wishes them well in planning the 2017 celebrations.


This council also remembers the sacrifice and determination of the people of Gloucester as they defended the parliamentary garrison (10th August to 5th September 1643) against the besieging army of King Charles I. The siege ended with the arrival of a relieving parliamentary army under the Earl of Essex.

 

This council recognises that the Siege of Gloucester is one of the most important events in the history of this city of which we should all be proud and that we agree to set up a cross party working group to consider what else we can do to remember and commemorate the events of 1643.

 

This council recognises and thanks the large number of people working in the city to promote Gloucester’s history through Gloucester Civic Trust and other organisations;  notes the success of the recent celebrations of the 800th anniversary of the coronation of Henry III primarily organised by the Cathedral and Marketing Gloucester; further notes the growing popularity of the two week History Festival and thanks the organisers and sponsors; and acknowledges the Administration’s manifesto commitment to stage a major History Festival in 2018 to celebrate the 375th anniversary of the Siege of Gloucester and the 1100th anniversary of the death of Aethelflaed.

 

This council believes that our approach to celebrating our history should be an inclusive one, making use of the talents, knowledge and enthusiasm of as many people as possible."

 

34.3    The motion was put to the vote and was carried.

 

(2)  Notice of Motion from the Labour Group

 

34.4    Moved by Councillor Lugg and seconded by Councillor Bhaimia:

 

“Gloucester City Council notes the recent media attention and prominence of environmental crime, primarily flytipping, and particularly in the Barton and Tredworth ward.

 

Council notes that Barton and Tredworth was, last year, the City’s flytipping hotspot with 1519 incidents reported, more than ten times the number in second place Moreland (147) and Matson and Robinswood (132). The ward has had the worst problem in the City for many years.

 

Resident’s quality of life and the appearance of the City is damaged by flytipping and other environmental crimes. The taxpayer has to pick up the bill.

 

Council calls upon the newly appointed Cabinet Member for Environment and the administration to take a firm stance against environmental crime as a priority, drawing on best practice from elsewhere in prevention and enforcement, to reduce the incidence of flytipping across Gloucester, particularly in identified hotspots.

 

Council resolves to work more effectively with local agencies, community groups and Gloucester City Homes, where appropriate, to use all available powers and step up enforcement to prosecute those flytipping.”

 

34.5    The motion was put to the vote and was carried.

 

(3)  Notice of Motion from the Labour Group

 

34.6    Moved by Councillor Haigh and seconded by Councillor Coole:

 

This Council notes the recent Rowntree Foundation report ‘Overcoming Deprivation and Disconnection in UK Cities’ which identified communities in Gloucester that form a disconnected core, and poor access to jobs and housing are key factors in deprivation.

 

Gloucester is the 139th most deprived district in the country, with areas of several wards in the top decile for housing, employment and income deprivation nationally.

 

The Rowntree report identified that top down “macro” approaches to deprivation, such as investment through the LEP, are doing little to improve the life chances of people in these wards? they recommend that a “micro” approach is taken to combat the unique factors that affect the life chances of residents. Regeneration in the City Centre is important, but the benefits of that regeneration must reach across the City and into all of our communities.

 

Deprivation can only be challenged effectively when professionals in housing, health and educational services work together with residents to meet the needs and issues of specific neighbourhoods and communities.

 

Councils have a duty to shape communities and drive improvements in the lives of resident.

 

This Council should take a lead in bringing together agencies and communities to identify and act upon the factors that are barriers to work and housing.

 

This Council resolves to take a flexible approach to working with communities to meet the needs that they identify, as well as achieving improved life chances for residents.

 

This Council will work with communities and agencies to formulate neighbourhood agreements, establishing responsibilities on both sides, as a way of building strong and active communities in a time of shrinking budgets.”

 

 

 

 

34.7    Councillor Hyman moved the following amendment which was seconded by Councillor Wilson:

 

This Council notes the recent Rowntree Foundation report ‘Overcoming Deprivation and Disconnection in UK Cities’ which identified communities in Gloucester that form a disconnected core, and poor access to jobs and housing are key factors in deprivation.

 

Gloucester is the 139th most deprived district in the country, with areas of several wards in the top decile for housing, employment and income deprivation nationally.

 

The Rowntree report identified that top down “macro” approaches to deprivation, such as investment through the LEP, are doing little to improve the life chances of people in these wards? they recommend that a “micro” approach is taken to combat the unique factors that affect the life chances of residents. Regeneration in the City Centre is important, but the benefits of that regeneration must reach across the City and into all of our communities.

 

Deprivation can only be challenged effectively when professionals in housing, health and educational services work together with residents to meet the needs and issues of specific neighbourhoods and communities.

 

Councils have a duty to shape work with communities and drive to help them achieve positive improvements in the their lives of resident.

 

This Council should take a lead in bringing together agencies and communities to identify and act upon the factors that are barriers to work and housing.

 

This Council resolves to take a flexible approach to working with communities to meet the needs that they identify, as well as achieving improved life chances for residents.

 

This Council will work with communities and agencies to formulate neighbourhood agreements, establishing responsibilities on both sides, as a way of building strong and active communities in a time of shrinking budgets.”

 

34.8    The motion was put to the vote and was carried.

 

34.9    Councillor Watkins moved the following amendment which was seconded by Councillor James:

 

This Council notes the recent Rowntree Foundation report ‘Overcoming Deprivation and Disconnection in UK Cities’ which identified communities in Gloucester that form a disconnected core, and poor access to jobs and housing are key factors in deprivation.

 

Gloucester is the 139th most deprived district in the country, with areas of several wards in the top decile for housing, employment and income deprivation nationally.

 

The Rowntree report identified that top down “macro” approaches to deprivation, such as investment through the LEP, are doing little to improve the life chances of people in these wards? they recommend that a “micro” approach is taken to combat the unique factors that affect the life chances of residents. Regeneration in the City Centre is important, but the benefits of that regeneration must reach across the City and into all of our communities.

 

Deprivation can only be challenged effectively when professionals in housing, health and educational services work together with residents to meet the needs and issues of specific neighbourhoods and communities.

 

Councils have a duty to work with communities to help them achieve positive improvements in their lives.

 

This Council should will continue to take a lead in bringing together agencies and communities to work in an asset-based way to identify and act upon the factors that are barriers to work, and housing and improved health and wellbeing.

 

This Council resolves to take a flexible approach to working with communities to meet the needs and aspirations that they identify, as well as achieving improved life chances for residents.

 

This Council will work with communities and agencies to formulate neighbourhood agreements, establishing responsibilities on both sides, as a way of building strong and active communities in a time of shrinking budgets resolves to bring a report to Cabinet setting out current work underway and future plans to deal with these complex issues.”

 

34.10  The motion was put to the vote and was carried.

 

 

 

 
 
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