Agenda item

Notices of Motion

1.    PROPOSED BY COUNCILLOR HILTON

 

“This council notes that planning permission was granted on the 2nd of May 2019 for the construction of a revised football stadium at Meadow Park (19/0008/FUL). 

 

This council notes that the directors of Gloucester City Association Football Club have applied for funding to the Football Stadia Improvement Fund, to help towards the cost of stadium’s construction.

 

This council agrees to continue to give its active support to Gloucester City Association Football Club in its return to Meadow Park.”

 

2.    PROPOSED BY COUNCILLOR FIELD

 

"This council can and must do more to tell the story of Gloucester."

 

3.    PROPOSED BY COUNCILLOR STEPHENS

 

“Council has declared a climate emergency and agreed to take action to make its carbon footprint neutral by 2030. It has further agreed that the whole of Gloucester should be carbon neutral by 2050.

 

Council recognises that a key part of achieving this will be to create a sustainable and environmentally friendly public transport system that precludes the use of petrol/ diesel propelled vehicles. Council further notes that this is in line with national government policy.

 

Council therefore endorses that we should move to all buses operating in the City being electric and that the City’s hackney carriage and private hire fleets should be net carbon neutral, with a target date of implementation of no later than 2026.

 

Council resolves:

 

1.    To request the Cabinet Member for the Environment to pursue urgent discussions with the Cabinet Member for Climate Change at the County Council to negotiate with the bus operators with a view to developing a timetable and action plan to convert the relevant fleets to use all electric vehicles as soon as possible, but no later than 2026.

 

2.    To prepare a detailed report on the above to the Cabinet within 6 months of the approval of this notice of motion.

 

3.    To prepare a report to the Licensing Committee in respect of the licensing of hackney carriage and private hire vehicles with a view to making both these fleets carbon neutral by 2026.

 

4.    That proposals to establish a network of charging points including within the development of Kings Quarter be developed as part of the above process.

 

5.    That the Council’s 2020/ 2021 capital & revenue budgets are drafted to contain provision for any costs that the Council will need to bear in relation to the above.

 

6.    That we lobby the government and the City MP to increase funding to local authorities to develop the charging infrastructure needed to maintain an all-electric vehicle transport system.”

 

Minutes:

Notice of Motion from Councillor Hilton

 

32.1    Councillor Hilton proposed and Councillor Wilson seconded the following motion:

 

           

“This council notes that planning permission was granted on the 2nd of May 2019 for the construction of a revised football stadium at Meadow Park (19/0008/FUL).

 

This council notes that the directors of Gloucester City Association Football Club have applied for funding to the Football Stadia Improvement Fund, to help towards the cost of stadium’s construction.

 

This council agrees to continue to give its active support to Gloucester City Association Football Club in its return to Meadow Park.”

 

32.2    The motion was put to the vote and was carried.

 

32.3    RESOLVED:

 

           

This council notes that planning permission was granted on the 2nd of May 2019 for the construction of a revised football stadium at Meadow Park (19/0008/FUL).

 

This council notes that the directors of Gloucester City Association Football Club have applied for funding to the Football Stadia Improvement Fund, to help towards the cost of stadium’s construction.

 

This council agrees to continue to give its active support to Gloucester City Association Football Club in its return to Meadow Park.

 

Notice of Motion from Councillor Field

 

32.4    Councillor Field proposed and Councillor Hyman seconded the following motion:

 

            "This council can and must do more to tell the story of Gloucester."

 

32.5    Councillor Morgan proposed and Councillor James seconded the following amendment:

 

           This council can and must do more to tell the story of Gloucester:

 

Believes the city’s rich history and diversity are amongst its greatest assets;

 

Recognises the great work done by a wide range of partners to tell the City’s story and in particular: -

 

  1. The Gloucester History Festival – a signature event in the City which includes Gloucester Day, one of the biggest Heritage Open Day weekends in the UK, the Blackfriars Talks which bring international authors, academics and experts to Gloucester and City Voices which tell the stories of Gloucester’s residents and communities.
  2. The Heritage Forum which brings together organisations across the City that have or are delivering over £10m in National Lottery investment to support key heritage sites including Project Pilgrim at Gloucester Cathedral, St Mary de Crypt, Llanthony Priory, Gloucester Southgate Street’s Townscape Heritage Initiative.
  3. The £1.49m awarded to the City for its Great Place Programme to further improve our cultural offer, destination management through online and digital signposting and interpretation, investment in festivals and events, the development of a City Heritage Strategy and support for heritage-based volunteering.
  4. Marketing Gloucester’s championing of the Mayflower 400 Project bringing US tourists to Gloucester as part of the 2020 celebrations of the Mayflower sailings.
  5. The development of the Gloucestershire Archives Heritage Hub as a base for state-of-the-art Family and Local History research and learning.
  6. The transfer of the former Gloucester Life Museum buildings in Westgate Street to the Gloucester Historic Buildings Trust and their use by the Gloucester Civic Trust as a centre for heritage volunteering, a base for city heritage tours and a venue for displays and exhibitions telling Gloucester’s story.
  7. The City’s vibrant festivals and events programme particularly those that tell the story of Gloucester's heritage; Gloucester Tall Ships and Adventure, Gloucester Goes Retro, Gloucester History Festival, Civil War re-enactments and events such as the celebration of the anniversaries of Aethelflaed and Henry III.
  8. The Museum of Gloucester which has seen a 300% increase in attendances this year following the reintroduction of free admission.
  9. The project to restore and revitalise the Olympus Theatre in Barton Street.

 

Acknowledges that more can be and is being done and welcomes:

 

  1. Plans to restore and reuse The Fleece Hotel, a Grade I listed testament to the City’s long and proud history.
  2. The marketing of the Herbert, Phillpotts and Kimberley Warehouses for re-use which will add to the variety of uses at Gloucester’s Historic Docks.
  3. The £1.9m awarded to the City for its Heritage Action Zone which will support the restoration of the Fleece and improve public realm and heritage shopfronts in Westgate Street.
  4. Plans for a Phase II for Project Pilgrim at Gloucester Cathedral.

 

Notes that the number of day visitors more than doubled from 1.69 million in 2010 to 3.46 million in 2018 when for the first time overnight stays reached more than 1 million and over 5000 jobs are supported in the city by the visitor economy;

 

Recognises that the challenge is to keep this momentum going and to bring Gloucester’s story to an ever-wider and ever-growing audience;

 

Reaffirms the importance of the role of the Mayor and Sheriff of Gloucester in promoting the city and its civic heritage in particular;

 

Asks officers to bring a report to Cabinet to set out proposals for refurbishment of the Museum of Gloucester to meet the Council’s objectives and to build on the last major works in 2011;

 

Identifies the potential that a bid for UK City of Culture 2025 has to focus on all that the city is doing and to put a local, national and international spotlight on Gloucester and deserves serious consideration.”

 

32.6    Councillor Field did not accept the amendment.

 

32.7    The amendment was put to the vote and was carried and therefore became the substantive motion.

 

32.8    The motion, as amended, was put to the vote and was carried.

 

32.9    RESOLVED:-

 

1.    The Gloucester History Festival – a signature event in the City which includes Gloucester Day, one of the biggest Heritage Open Day weekends in the UK, the Blackfriars Talks which bring international authors, academics and experts to Gloucester and City Voices which tell the stories of Gloucester’s residents and communities.

2.    The Heritage Forum which brings together organisations across the City that have or are delivering over £10m in National Lottery investment to support key heritage sites including Project Pilgrim at Gloucester Cathedral, St Mary de Crypt, Llanthony Priory, Gloucester Southgate Street’s Townscape Heritage Initiative.

3.    The £1.49m awarded to the City for its Great Place Programme to further improve our cultural offer, destination management through online and digital signposting and interpretation, investment in festivals and events, the development of a City Heritage Strategy and support for heritage-based volunteering.

4.    Marketing Gloucester’s championing of the Mayflower 400 Project bringing US tourists to Gloucester as part of the 2020 celebrations of the Mayflower sailings.

5.    The development of the Gloucestershire Archives Heritage Hub as a base for state-of-the-art Family and Local History research and learning.

6.    The transfer of the former Gloucester Life Museum buildings in Westgate Street to the Gloucester Historic Buildings Trust and their use by the Gloucester Civic Trust as a centre for heritage volunteering, a base for city heritage tours and a venue for displays and exhibitions telling Gloucester’s story.

7.    The City’s vibrant festivals and events programme particularly those that tell the story of Gloucester's heritage; Gloucester Tall Ships and Adventure, Gloucester Goes Retro, Gloucester History Festival, Civil War re-enactments and events such as the celebration of the anniversaries of Aethelflaed and Henry III.

8.    The Museum of Gloucester which has seen a 300% increase in attendances this year following the reintroduction of free admission.

9.    The project to restore and revitalise the Olympus Theatre in Barton Street.

 

Acknowledges that more can be and is being done and welcomes:

 

1.   Plans to restore and reuse The Fleece Hotel, a Grade I listed testament to the City’s long and proud history.

2.   The marketing of the Herbert, Phillpotts and Kimberley Warehouses for re-use which will add to the variety of uses at Gloucester’s Historic Docks.

3.   The £1.9m awarded to the City for its Heritage Action Zone which will support the restoration of the Fleece and improve public realm and heritage shopfronts in Westgate Street.

4.   Plans for a Phase II for Project Pilgrim at Gloucester Cathedral.

 

Notes that the number of day visitors more than doubled from 1.69 million in 2010 to 3.46 million in 2018 when for the first time overnight stays reached more than 1 million and over 5000 jobs are supported in the city by the visitor economy;

 

Recognises that the challenge is to keep this momentum going and to bring Gloucester’s story to an ever-wider and ever-growing audience;

 

Reaffirms the importance of the role of the Mayor and Sheriff of Gloucester in promoting the city and its civic heritage in particular;

 

Asks officers to bring a report to Cabinet to set out proposals for refurbishment of the Museum of Gloucester to meet the Council’s objectives and to build on the last major works in 2011;

 

Identifies the potential that a bid for UK City of Culture 2025 has to focus on all that the city is doing and to put a local, national and international spotlight on Gloucester and deserves serious consideration.”

 

 

     

32.10  The amendment was put to the carried and was carried and therefore became the substantive motion.

32.11  RESOLVED:-

 

1.         The Gloucester History Festival – a signature event in the City which includes Gloucester Day, one of the biggest Heritage Open Day weekends in the UK, the Blackfriars Talks which bring international authors, academics and experts to Gloucester and City Voices which tell the stories of Gloucester’s residents and communities.

2.         The Heritage Forum which brings together organisations across the City that have or are delivering over £10m in National Lottery investment to support key heritage sites including Project Pilgrim at Gloucester Cathedral, St Mary de Crypt, Llanthony Priory, Gloucester Southgate Street’s Townscape Heritage Initiative.

3.         The £1.49m awarded to the City for its Great Place Programme to further improve our cultural offer, destination management through online and digital signposting and interpretation, investment in festivals and events, the development of a City Heritage Strategy and support for heritage-based volunteering.

4.         Marketing Gloucester’s championing of the Mayflower 400 Project bringing US tourists to Gloucester as part of the 2020 celebrations of the Mayflower sailings.

5.         The development of the Gloucestershire Archives Heritage Hub as a base for state-of-the-art Family and Local History research and learning.

6.         The transfer of the former Gloucester Life Museum buildings in Westgate Street to the Gloucester Historic Buildings Trust and their use by the Gloucester Civic Trust as a centre for heritage volunteering, a base for city heritage tours and a venue for displays and exhibitions telling Gloucester’s story.

7.         The City’s vibrant festivals and events programme particularly those that tell the story of Gloucester's heritage; Gloucester Tall Ships and Adventure, Gloucester Goes Retro, Gloucester History Festival, Civil War re-enactments and events such as the celebration of the anniversaries of Aethelflaed and Henry III.

8.         The Museum of Gloucester which has seen a 300% increase in attendances this year following the reintroduction of free admission.

9.         The project to restore and revitalise the Olympus Theatre in Barton Street.

 

Acknowledges that more can be and is being done and welcomes:

 

1.         Plans to restore and reuse The Fleece Hotel, a Grade I listed testament to the City’s long and proud history.

2.         The marketing of the Herbert, Phillpotts and Kimberley Warehouses for re-use which will add to the variety of uses at Gloucester’s Historic Docks.

3.         The £1.9m awarded to the City for its Heritage Action Zone which will support the restoration of the Fleece and improve public realm and heritage shopfronts in Westgate Street.

4.         Plans for a Phase II for Project Pilgrim at Gloucester Cathedral.

 

Notes that the number of day visitors more than doubled from 1.69 million in 2010 to 3.46 million in 2018 when for the first time overnight stays reached more than 1 million and over 5000 jobs are supported in the city by the visitor economy;

 

Recognises that the challenge is to keep this momentum going and to bring Gloucester’s story to an ever-wider and ever-growing audience;

 

Reaffirms the importance of the role of the Mayor and Sheriff of

Gloucester in promoting the city and its civic heritage in particular;

 

Asks officers to bring a report to Cabinet to set out proposals for refurbishment of the Museum of Gloucester to meet the Council’s objectives and to build on the last major works in 2011;

 

Identifies the potential that a bid for UK City of Culture 2025 has to focus on all that the city is doing and to put a local, national and international spotlight on Gloucester and deserves serious consideration.

 

Notice of Motion from Councillor Stephens

 

32.12  Councillor Stephens proposed and Councillor Pullen proposed the following motion:

 

“Council has declared a climate emergency and agreed to take action to make its carbon footprint neutral by 2030. It has further agreed that the whole of Gloucester should be carbon neutral by 2050.

 

Council recognises that a key part of achieving this will be to create a sustainable and environmentally friendly public transport system that precludes the use of petrol/ diesel propelled vehicles. Council further notes that this is in line with national government policy.

 

Council therefore endorses that we should move to all buses operating in the City being electric and that the City’s hackney carriage and private hire fleets should be net carbon neutral, with a target date of implementation of no later than 2026.

 

Council resolves:

 

1.         To request the Cabinet Member for the Environment to pursue urgent discussions with the Cabinet Member for Climate Change at the County Council to negotiate with the bus operators with a view to developing a timetable and action plan to convert the relevant fleets to use all electric vehicles as soon as possible, but no later than 2026.

 

2.         To prepare a detailed report on the above to the Cabinet within 6 months of the approval of this notice of motion.

 

3.         To prepare a report to the Licensing Committee in respect of the licensing of hackney carriage and private hire vehicles with a view to making both these fleets carbon neutral by 2026.

 

4.         That proposals to establish a network of charging points including within the development of Kings Quarter be developed as part of the above process.

 

5.         That the Council’s 2020/ 2021 capital & revenue budgets are drafted to contain provision for any costs that the Council will need to bear in relation to the above.

 

6.         That we lobby the government and the City MP to increase funding to local authorities to develop the charging infrastructure needed to maintain an all-electric vehicle transport system.”

 

32.13  Councillor Cook proposed and Councillor James seconded the following amendment:

 

“Council has declared a climate emergency and agreed to take action to make its carbon footprint neutral by 2030. It has further agreed that the whole of Gloucester should be carbon neutral by 2050.

 

Council recognises that a key part of achieving this will be to create a sustainable and environmentally friendly public transport system that precludes the use of petrol/ diesel propelled vehicles. Council further notes that this is in line with national government policy.

 

Council therefore endorses that we should commence the move to all buses operating in the City being electric using alternative fuels by 2025, and that the City’s hackney carriage and private hire fleets should be net carbon neutral, with a target date of implementation of no later than 2026 2030.

 

Council resolves:

 

1.To request the Cabinet Member for the Environment to pursue urgent discussions with the Cabinet Member for Climate Change at the County Council to negotiate with the bus operators with a view to developing a timetable and action plan to convert the relevant fleets to use all electric alternative fuel vehicles as soon as possible, but no later than 2026 commencing by 2025.

 

2.To prepare a detailed report on the above to the Cabinet within 6 months of the approval of this notice of motion.

 

3.To prepare a report to the Licensing Committee in respect of the licensing of hackney carriage and private hire vehicles with a view to making both these fleets carbon neutral by 2026 2030.

 

4.That proposals to establish a network of charging points including within the development of Kings Quarter be developed as part of the above process.

 

5. That the Council’s 2020/ 2021 capital & revenue budgets are drafted to contain provision for any costs that the Council will need to bear in relation to the above.

 

6. That we lobby the government and the City MP to increase funding to local authorities to develop the charging infrastructure needed to maintain an all-electric vehicle transport system.”

 

32.14  Councillor Stephens accepted the amendment which therefore became the substantive motion. The motion was put to the vote and was carried.

 

32.15  RESOLVED that:-

 

Council has declared a climate emergency and agreed to take action to make its carbon footprint neutral by 2030. It has further agreed that the whole of Gloucester should be carbon neutral by 2050.

 

Council recognises that a key part of achieving this will be to create a sustainable and environmentally friendly public transport system that precludes the use of petrol/ diesel propelled vehicles. Council further notes that this is in line with national government policy.

 

Council therefore endorses that we should commence the move to all buses operating in the City using alternative fuels by 2025,and that the City’s hackney carriage and private hire fleets should be net carbon neutral, with a target date of implementation of no later than 2030.

 

Council resolves:

 

1.    To request the Cabinet Member for the Environment to pursue urgent discussions with the Cabinet Member for Climate Change at the County Council to negotiate with the bus operators with a view to developing a timetable and action plan to convert the relevant fleets to use alternative fuel vehicles commencing by 2025.

 

2.    To prepare a detailed report on the above to the Cabinet within 6 months of the approval of this notice of motion.

 

3.    To prepare a report to the Licensing Committee in respect of the licensing of hackney carriage and private hire vehicles with a view to making both these fleets carbon neutral by 2030.

 

4.    That proposals to establish a network of charging points including within the development of Kings Quarter be developed as part of the above process.

 

5.    That the Council’s 2020/ 2021 capital & revenue budgets are drafted to contain provision for any costs that the Council will need to bear in relation to the above.

 

6.    That we lobby the government and the City MP to increase funding to local authorities to develop the charging infrastructure needed to maintain an all-electric vehicle transport system.

 

 

 
 
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